...or something like that
I WOULD WATCH THIS!

I WOULD WATCH THIS!

[Ridley] Scott had wanted the Alien to bite off Ripley’s head and then make the final log entry in her voice, but the producers vetoed this idea as they believed that the Alien had to die at the end of the film.

The wikipedia article on “Alien”

So pumped for Prometheus!!! But i’ll admit, seeing this made me worry a little. But i’m sure he’s grown as a director….right?

I’m watching Alien in preparation for my screening of Prometheus (Press screenings for the win!). It reminded me of this awesome poster!
Artist Tristan Jones (IDW’s Ghostbusters, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) designed  it, and I absolutely love it!! He is selling A1 copies of it through his site and they’re in limited supply. Buy one! I know I am!
You can also check out more of Tristan’s art here. He also sells many of his prints at All Star Comics, if you’re a Melbourne local.

I’m watching Alien in preparation for my screening of Prometheus (Press screenings for the win!). It reminded me of this awesome poster!

Artist Tristan Jones (IDW’s Ghostbusters, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) designed  it, and I absolutely love it!! He is selling A1 copies of it through his site and they’re in limited supply. Buy one! I know I am!

You can also check out more of Tristan’s art here. He also sells many of his prints at All Star Comics, if you’re a Melbourne local.

Review: “Life in a Day”
So I was all set to watching Skins, and then my housemate mentioned that Youtube was streaming “Life in a Day”. It had been at Sundance, and they were rebroadcasting it for everyone to see over Youtube. And I am really glad they did!
So what is “Life in a Day”? It was a project co-ordinated by Ridley Scott and Kevin MacDonald, with Youtube. On July 24, people were asked to record their day. Film what they do, where they go, who they talk to, and then upload it to Youtube. These submissions were then edited together into one documentary. The completed film is 94 minutes 57 seconds long and includes scenes from 4,500 hours of footage in 80,000 submissions from 140 nations. The idea was to create a documentary that shows what life is like: How do people live, and what does that mean. To literally show a day in the life of a person on this planet. And boy does it suceed.
I started watching this when the broadcast began, ready to make dinner. Then, I brought my laptop with me to cook. And then with me again, back to the lounge room to eat. I didn’t stop watching. It was mesmerising! I wasn’t sure what I was going to get when it started, but by the end I had no doubt. They promised “lLife in a Day”, and they delivered. Starting in the morning and ending at midnight, the film cut together various bits of footage from people’s lives. From normal everyday tasks like brushing our teeth, driving to work, making lunch, to more special events, like a boy’s first shave, a wedding, and a Korean man riding around the world. Everything felt honest, and real. Excluding one hipster girl (Really? You just happened to be posing in a forrest today, pondering life’s big questions?), everyone seemed to be opening their lives to the audience. 
Something that also struck me was the global nature of the footage. It wasn’t the life in an American day, or a French day, it truly felt I was seeing one day in the world. And not in a condescending or stereotypical way either. There was a small section juxtaposing an Afghani photographer, and the wife of an American troop who is overseas. At first, I thought it was going to be exact what I expected: The poor Afghani and the spoilt American. But, as with the rest of the film, I was struck by the honesty and reality of the people. The Afghani spoke of his love of photography, how he loved going to the old part of Kabul and taking photos, and his family. I didn’t get the media view of a poor, war-torn country. I got his life. And the wife seemed boring: choosing what to wear, straightening her hair, talking to her dog. But then you realise she is getting ready to Skype with her husband overseas. And it all felt real. I teared up when he said goodbye, turn of his camera, and she cried. Like she had no idea what to do next.
That is what I felt coming away from this film. The honesty of everything. Another point I teared up (there were only two, I swear) was when a husband was answer the question “What do you fear?”. He said he feared his wife getting cancer, and she did. Then he feared it coming back, and it did. And that now that it was gone, all his fears were gone. He was “fearless”. The whole film gives you moments like these: snapshots of people’s lives on July 24th. There was no narration, no director behind the camera asking questions. Just the footage people shot, edited together to show a world that were all alive and doing things that day. It truly felt like a documentary on life.
It was real, and honest, and magical. It is a beautiful piece of art, and a worthy study of what it is to live in this world. Find this film when it comes out/next streams, and watch it! 

Review: “Life in a Day”

So I was all set to watching Skins, and then my housemate mentioned that Youtube was streaming “Life in a Day”. It had been at Sundance, and they were rebroadcasting it for everyone to see over Youtube. And I am really glad they did!

So what is “Life in a Day”? It was a project co-ordinated by Ridley Scott and Kevin MacDonald, with Youtube. On July 24, people were asked to record their day. Film what they do, where they go, who they talk to, and then upload it to Youtube. These submissions were then edited together into one documentary. The completed film is 94 minutes 57 seconds long and includes scenes from 4,500 hours of footage in 80,000 submissions from 140 nations. The idea was to create a documentary that shows what life is like: How do people live, and what does that mean. To literally show a day in the life of a person on this planet. And boy does it suceed.

I started watching this when the broadcast began, ready to make dinner. Then, I brought my laptop with me to cook. And then with me again, back to the lounge room to eat. I didn’t stop watching. It was mesmerising! I wasn’t sure what I was going to get when it started, but by the end I had no doubt. They promised “lLife in a Day”, and they delivered. Starting in the morning and ending at midnight, the film cut together various bits of footage from people’s lives. From normal everyday tasks like brushing our teeth, driving to work, making lunch, to more special events, like a boy’s first shave, a wedding, and a Korean man riding around the world. Everything felt honest, and real. Excluding one hipster girl (Really? You just happened to be posing in a forrest today, pondering life’s big questions?), everyone seemed to be opening their lives to the audience. 

Something that also struck me was the global nature of the footage. It wasn’t the life in an American day, or a French day, it truly felt I was seeing one day in the world. And not in a condescending or stereotypical way either. There was a small section juxtaposing an Afghani photographer, and the wife of an American troop who is overseas. At first, I thought it was going to be exact what I expected: The poor Afghani and the spoilt American. But, as with the rest of the film, I was struck by the honesty and reality of the people. The Afghani spoke of his love of photography, how he loved going to the old part of Kabul and taking photos, and his family. I didn’t get the media view of a poor, war-torn country. I got his life. And the wife seemed boring: choosing what to wear, straightening her hair, talking to her dog. But then you realise she is getting ready to Skype with her husband overseas. And it all felt real. I teared up when he said goodbye, turn of his camera, and she cried. Like she had no idea what to do next.

That is what I felt coming away from this film. The honesty of everything. Another point I teared up (there were only two, I swear) was when a husband was answer the question “What do you fear?”. He said he feared his wife getting cancer, and she did. Then he feared it coming back, and it did. And that now that it was gone, all his fears were gone. He was “fearless”. The whole film gives you moments like these: snapshots of people’s lives on July 24th. There was no narration, no director behind the camera asking questions. Just the footage people shot, edited together to show a world that were all alive and doing things that day. It truly felt like a documentary on life.

It was real, and honest, and magical. It is a beautiful piece of art, and a worthy study of what it is to live in this world. Find this film when it comes out/next streams, and watch it!